Almost All Systems Are GO… Part 1

***Note: When I finished this blog post, it was really loooooooong. So I’m splitting it up into several parts. This first part gives a brief introduction on the idea behind the series, and delves into the first of my productivity systems, which deals with inspiration and energy. Check back soon for more installments!***

Two months ago, on New Year’s Eve, I published a post about my 2016 Writing Plan and all of the creative goals I hope to achieve this year. Three weeks later I began to write this blog post, got over half of it written, got distracted, and didn’t come back to it until tonight. As you can see, my 2016 Writing Plan is hitting the requisite slumps and blocks. But good news! Despite random periods of slumpishness, I am well on my way to doing all the things! (I even was offered beard help.) I’m feeling productive. The words are flowing. The plots are coalescing. The ideas are being seized upon before they flit away. But none of it would be so, were it not for my SYSTEMS. As promised, I am writing this post to fill you in on the details of the 2016 Writing Plan’s logistics and behind the scenes operations.

cat-productivity-caption

I started implementing my systems about five months ago, little by little. Some of them are still in the beta testing phase, and they are all still subject to refinement, but I think I have enough data to illustrate how they work.

The purpose of each of my systems is to get me to do four things:

  1. Stay inspired and energized on my creative projects.
  2. Manage my time, including work time, family time, down time and creative time, in such a way that I don’t end up TOTALLY SLACKING OFF.
  3. Strike a balance for my writing between the spine-tingling creative rush and the tick-tock production schedule.
  4. Most importantly, MAKE MY LIFE MORE ABOUT WRITING. Otherwise known as Immersion.

So, what are these brilliant systems, you ask? I will tell you.

Inspiration and Energy

Here’s a scenario that has happened to me about a hundred too many times. I’m working on this awesome project–a short story or a novel or an article or a blog post, whatever–and I’m just chugging along, feeling super inspired, writing 5,000 words in one sitting, not being able to stop thinking about the project for days on end…and then, Something Happens. It might be a family emergency, or the sudden realization that I am behind on other things, or it might be that I suddenly get stuck in the plot of what I’m writing. In the past, I’ve responded to this sort of interruption by stopping. I can’t say how many times I’ve told myself, “I’ll just take a short break for a day or two, and then get right back to it”, but let’s just say if I had a dime for each one, I’d probably be a hundredaire.

So last year when I was evaluating the roadblocks on my path to being a better and more prolific writer, I identified this one as “easily losing inspiration/energy.” To avoid this roadblock, I needed a system for maintaining inspiration and energy. Here’s what I came up with.

  • Write every day. My current daily word count goal is 800 words of fresh drafting or one scene of revision, which is a good goal (challenging but reachable) for where I’m at in my life right now. But if my schedule tightens up, I’m not scared to reduce that goal to whatever I can tap out in ten minutes. Likewise, if ever there’s a lull in Things To Do, I can ramp up the daily wordcount to fill up all that free time.
  • Have multiple projects going at once. A novel and a short story is working well for me at the moment. This way, if I run into a quagmire in the novel that I’m not sure how to resolve, instead of losing interest and letting my energy wane on the project, I switch over to the short story for a few days. When I do this, I am refusing to let my ideas stop steeping (which is essential to working out plot problems), or my writing muscles atrophy. I’m keeping up with my daily writing, and while I get all stoked on project B, project A is still simmering in the back of my mind, hopefully working out its own kinks. This method has already helped me immensely.
  • Writerly fellowship and peer pressure. My writer friends keep me on track. I’m part of two writing groups, one virtual and one local. My Odyssey class meets weekly on Google Chat to brainstorm and commiserate, and we have a running competition for who can get the most story rejections. We also have a couple of in-person reunion events planned for 2016, because we love each other with a deep and passionate love that makes your marriage look like a last ditch prom date. I’m also part of a group that convenes in meat space near where I live, once a week to critique each other’s stories. After the critiquing, we gather in a circle to type at a feverish pace for about an hour. It’s surprising how effective peer pressure can be for your word count. I’m a busy person outside of writing, so I don’t make it to every meeting of either of these groups, but I try to do at least one of them each week, if not both. It really, really helps. These people understand me, and they encourage and inspire me in ways that no one else really can.
  • Write at a particular time each day. To be honest, I haven’t gotten this one down yet. The idea is that if you sit down to write at the same time each day, you will eventually have your brain trained to be in creative mode at that time. My life is so wacky, however, that it’s really difficult to carve out a specific block of time for anything that can be repeated daily. But I’m hoping that as I get my other activities and responsibilities shuffled into something approaching an orderly schedule, a consistent time for writing will emerge. UPDATE: Since writing this post, I have upgraded to a morning routine, and have been spending at least one hour on writing projects first thing after breakfast each day. The routine is working really well for me, and I’m getting my writing done each day when my mind is at its freshest and most creative!

So, that’s it for inspiration and energy. Look out for future installments of this series, which I will post as I finish revising them.

 

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One thought on “Almost All Systems Are GO… Part 1

  1. I hear you on maintaining energy. It is hard for me, too. Looking back, I’ve found myself losing an entire month at a time due to various things. It’s so discouraging to look back and see it.

    I want to write every day but I’ve found for myself it’s a good way to burn out. I try to take 1-2 days off max per week.

    Also, there are editing, planning, formatting and marketing days which muddy the water.

    That peer pressure thing sounds really great. I wish I could get some of it but I work in complete isolation.

    One thing that has worked for me, no idea if it would work for anyone else, is being extremely conscious of how I spend my time.

    I use a pomodoro timer and have a target number of sessions to do per day. There’s some merit in clinging to a schedule more than a target word count.

    Then I track my time usage with rescuetime, an an app that runs on my desktop and browser. It’s like a sanity check. I think I had a good day and check rescuetime only to find I spent just half my workday actually writing. Ugh.

    Also, I journal daily about what I want to do and what I actually do. I also have a spreadsheet where I track daily word counts and have to insert an explanation if I didn’t meet my goal.

    Anyway, best wishes!

    Like

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